OASIS Extracellular Matrix

Wound healing and tissue regeneration

OASIS Extracellular Matrix

OASIS® Extracellular Matrix (ECM) supports the body’s own healing process by providing a natural, intact, extracellular matrix1.

OASIS Extracellular Matrix is an acellular ECM derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS).

What is OASIS Extracellular Matrix?

OASIS® Extracellular Matrix is an acellular ECM derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). It is composed of collagens, fibronectin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and growth factors2-12. OASIS aids bioactivity and creates an environment that allows cells in the body to secrete growth factors and replicate3-13.

SIS Characteristics

SIS products support the body’s own healing process by providing a natural ECM scaffold that remodels into patient tissue.

Extracellular matrix (ECM) is an essential part of wound healing. It provides a natural, collagen scaffold that supports cellular ingrowth14. Wounds with a dysfunctional or missing ECM cannot support proper wound closure14.

EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX COMPONENTS EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX COMPONENTS FUNCTIONS OASIS SKIN
Collagens (I, III, IV, VI)6-9 These provide the framework for the infiltration of host cells and lasting strength during the remodelling process15
Growth factors:

  • Fibroblast growth factor4
  • Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)12
  • Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)11
These factors play a role in angiogenesis, vascular repair and development, and cell migration and proliferation16,17
Glycoproteins, such as fibronectin and other protein-carbohydrate complexes, such as proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans2,5,13,18 These act as chemo-attractors, provide cell attachment sites in the matrix, and help regulate the complex processes of cell migration, proliferation and differentiation19-21

 

 

 

  1. Hodde J, Janis A, Ernst D, et al. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: Part I. Composition and matrix architecture. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):537-543.
  2. McPherson TB, Badylak SF. Characterization of fibronectin derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa. Tissue Eng. 1998;4:75-83.
  3. Hodde J, Janis A, Hiles M. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: part II. Bioactivity and matrix interaction. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):545-550.
  4. Voytik-Harbin SL, Brightman AO, Kraine MR, et al. Identification of extractable growth factors from small intestinal submucosa. J Cell Biochem. 1997;67(4):478-491.
  5. Hodde J, Janis A, Ernst D, et al. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: Part I. Composition and matrix architecture. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):537-543.
  6. Internal Cook Biotech Document: 97-010 VIIIA.
  7. Internal Cook Biotech Document: 97:010 VIIIB.
  8. Internal Cook Biotech Document: 07-057.
  9. Internal Cook Biotech Document: 00-027.
  10. Clark RA. Basics of cutaneous wound repair. J Dermatol Surg Oncol. 1993;19(8):693-706.
  11. McDevitt CA, Wildey GM, Cutrone RM. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 in a sterilized tissue derived from the pig small intestine submucosa. J Biomed Mater Res Part A. 2003;67(2):637-640.
  12. Internal Cook Biotech Document: 05-128.
  13. Nihsen ES, Johnson CE, Hiles MC. Bioactivity of small intestinal submucosa and oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen. Adv Skin Wound Care. 2008;21(10):479-486.
  14. Clark RA. Fibrin and wound healing. Ann NY Acad Sci. 2001; 936:355-367.
  15. McPherson JM, Piez KA. Collagen in Dermal Wound Repair. In: Clark RAF, Henson PM, editors. The Molecular and Cellular Biology of Wound Repair. New York: Plenum Press, 1988:471-491.
  16. Rizzino A. Trasforming growth factor-ß: multiple effects on cell differentiation and extracellular matrices. Dev Biol. 1988;130(2):411-422.
  17. Takehara K. Growth regulation of skin fibroblasts. J Dermatol Sci. 2000;24(suppl 1):S70-S77.
  18. Hurst RE, Bonner RB. Mapping of the distribution of significant proteins and proteoglycans in small intestinal submucosa by fluorescence microscopy. J Biomater Sci Polym Ed. 2001;12(11):1267-1279.1
  19. Raman R, Sasisekharan V, Sasisekharan R. Structural insights into biological roles of protein-glycosaminoglycan interactions. Chem Biol. 2005;12(3):267-277.
  20. Sottile J, Hocking DC. Fibronectin polymerization regulates the composition and stability of extracellular matrix fibrils and cell-matrix adhesions. Mol Biol Cell. 2002;13(10):3546-3559.
  21. Akiyama SK. Integrins in cell adhesion and signaling. Hum Cell. 1996;9(3):181-186

With over 20+ years of clinical use, SIS is supported by over 1,500 published articles. OASIS Extracellular Matrix has been widely used in woundcare, with 71 publications, 8 of which are RCTs.

Author(s) Title
N/A Clinical evidence list OASIS Extracellular Matrix View
Khoa, D and Lai, MD. Case study: Second-degree Chest Burn View
Sisto, T., Sugioka, W. and Filgo, S. Case study: Second-degree Right Palmar Burn View
Suzuki, K. Case study: Traumatic Ankle Injury View
Yalif, A. Caste study: Sacral/Bilateral Ischial Pressure Ulcers View

 

 

  1. Hodde J, Janis A, Ernst D, et al. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: Part I. Composition and matrix architecture. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):537-543.

Indications

OASIS Extracellular Matrix provides flexibility and versatility for different needs of acute and chronic wounds including:

  • Surgical wounds (post-Mohs’ surgery, post-laser surgery, podiatric, wound dehiscence)
  • Donor sites/grafts
  • Burns (second-degree only)
  • Chronic vascular ulcers
  • Diabetic ulcers
  • Draining wounds
  • Partial- and full-thickness wounds
  • Pressure ulcers
  • Trauma wounds (abrasions, lacerations, skin tears)
  • Venous ulcers

 

 

  1. Hodde J, Janis A, Ernst D, et al. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: Part I. Composition and matrix architecture. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):537-543.

OASIS Extracellular Matrix supports the body’s own healing process by providing a natural, intact extracellular matrix1. OASIS Extracellular Matrix provides flexibility and versatility for different needs of acute and chronic wounds.

Application instructions

 

 

1. Hodde J, Janis A, Ernst D, et al. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: Part I. Composition and matrix architecture. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):537-543.

 

 

Ordering details

For orders, deliveries and general enquires please contact H&R Healthcare:

Tel: +44 (0)1482 631606

Fax: +44 (0)1482 631630

Email: customerservices@hrhealthcare.co.uk

Monday to Friday: 8.30am to 5pm

Size Pieces per box Product code
3 x 3.5cm 10 C-ECM-1F-3X3.5-2
3 x 7cm 10 C-ECM-1F-3X7-2
7 x 10cm 1 C-ECM-1M-7X10-2
7 x 20cm 1 C-ECM-1M-7X20-2
7 x 20cm 1 C-ECM-2M-7X20-2

 

 

  1. Hodde J, Janis A, Ernst D, et al. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: Part I. Composition and matrix architecture. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):537-543.