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OASIS Extracellular Matrix

Extracellular matrix

OASIS® Extracellular Matrix supports wound healing and tissue repair.1-3

The Extracellular Matrix (ECM) is the complex environment upon which cells orient and move in response to other cells and signals.4

FEATURES

COOK BIOTECH

Product Benefits

What is OASIS Extracellular Matrix?

OASIS Extracellular Matrix is an acellular ECM derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). It is derived using a process that retains the natural composition of matrix molecules such as collagens, glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins, and growth factors.5-9

OASIS provides an environment that allows cells in the body to secrete growth factors and divide.10-11

SIS Characteristics

SIS products support the body’s own healing process by providing a natural ECM scaffold that remodels into patient tissue.

OASIS Extracellular Matrix components and component functions

Extracellular matrix (ECM) is an essential part of wound healing. It provides a natural, collagen scaffold that supports cellular ingrowth.21 Wounds with a dysfunctional or missing ECM cannot support proper wound closure.21

SHOW REFERENCES

  1. Mostow EN, Haraway GD, Dalsing M, Hodde JP, King D; OASIS Venus Ulcer Study Group. Effectiveness of an extracellular matrix graft (OASIS Wound Matrix) in the treatment of chronic leg ulcers: a randomized clinical trial.
    J Vasc Surg. 2005;41(5):837-843.
  2. Niezgoda JA, Van Gils CC, Frykberg RG, Hodde JP. Randomized clinical trial comparing Oasis Wound Matrix to Regranex Gel for diabetic ulcers. Adv Skin Wound Care. 2005;18(5 Pt 1):258-266.
  3. Glik J, Kawecki M, Kitala D, et al. A new option for definitive burn wound closure – pair matching type of retrospective case-control study of hand burns in the hospitalised patients group in the Dr Stanislaw Sakiel Centre for Burn Treatment between 2009 and 2015. Int Wound J. 2017;14(5):849-855.
  4. Kyburz KA, Anseth KS. Synthetic mimics of the extracellular matrix: How simple is complex enough? Ann Biomed Eng. 2015;43(3):489-500.
  5. Hodde JP, Badylak SF, Brightman AO, Voytik-Harbin SL. Glycosaminoglycan content of small intestinal submucosa: a bioscaffold for tissue replacement. Tissue Eng. 1996;2(3):209-217.
  6. Hodde J, Janis A, Ernst D, Zopf D, Sherman D, Johnson C. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: Part I. Composition and matrix architecture. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):537-543.
  7. Hurst RE, Bonner RB. Mapping of the distribution of significant proteins and proteoglycans in small intestinal submucosa by fluorescence microscopy. J Biomater Sci Polym Ed. 2001;12(11):1267-1279.
  8. Hodde JP, Ernst DM, Hiles MC. An investigation of the long-term bioactivity of endogenous growth factor in OASIS Wound Matrix. J Wound Care. 2005;14(1):23-25.
  9. McDevitt CA, Wildey GM, Cutrone RM. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 in a sterilized tissue derived from the pig small intestine submucosa. J Biomed Mater Res Part A. 2003;67(2):637-640.
  10. Hodde J, Janis A, Hiles M. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: part II. Bioactivity and matrix interaction. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):545-550.
  11. Nihsen ES, Johnson CE, Hiles MC. Bioactivity of small intestinal submucosa and oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen. Adv Skin Wound Care. 2008;21(10):479-486.
  12. Frantz C, Stewart KM, Weaver VM. The extracellular matrix at a glance. J Cell Sci. 2010;123(24):4195-4200.
  13. McPherson JM, Piez KA. Collagen in dermal wound repair. In: Clark RAF, Henson PM, eds. The molecular and cellular biology of wound repair. New York: Plenum Press: 1988:471-496.
  14. Rizzino A. Transforming growth factor-ß: multiple effects on cell differentiation and extracellular matrices. Dev Biol. 1988;130(2):411-422.
  15. Takehara K. Growth regulation of skin fibroblasts. J Dermatol Sci. 2000;24(suppl 1):S70-S77.
  16. Raman R, Sasisekharan V, Sasisekharan R.Structural insights into biological roles of protein-glycosaminoglycan interactions. Chem Biol. 2005;12(3):267-277.
  17. Sottile J, Hocking DC. Fibronectin polymerization regulates the composition and stability of extracellular matrix fibrils and cell-matrix adhesions. Mol Biol Cell. 2002;13(10):3546-3559.
  18. Akiyama SK. Integrins in cell adhesion and signaling. Hum Cell. 1996;9(3):181-186.
  19. Uitto J, Olsen DR, Fazio MJ. Extracellular matrix of the skin: 50 years of progress. J Invest Dermatol. 1989;92(4 Suppl):61S-77S.
  20. Eckes B, Nischt R, Krieg T. Cell-matrix interactions in dermal repair and scarring. Fibrogenesis Tissue Repair. 2010;11;3:4.
  21. Clark RA. Fibrin and wound healing. Ann NY Acad Sci. 2001; 936:355-367

Clinical Evidence

With over 20+ years of clinical use, SIS is supported by over 1,600 published articles. OASIS Extracellular Matrix has been widely used in woundcare, with 80 publications, 10 of which are RCTs, as of July, 2020.

Author(s)

Title

N/A

Clinical evidence list OASIS Extracellular Matrix

Khoa, D and Lai, MD.

Case study: Second-degree Chest Burn

Sisto, T., Sugioka, W. and Filgo, S.

Case study: Second-degree Right Palmar Burn

Suzuki, K.

Case study: Traumatic Ankle Injury

Yalif, A.

Caste study: Sacral/Bilateral Ischial Pressure Ulcers


Indications

OASIS Extracellular Matrix provides flexibility and versatility for different needs of acute and chronic wounds including:

  • Abrasions
  • Burns (second degree only)
  • Chronic vascular ulcers
  • Diabetic ulcers
  • Donor sites
  • Lacerations
  • Post-surgical dermal wounds
  • Skin tears
  • Venous ulcers

Applying OASIS Extracellular Matrix*

OASIS Extracellular Matrix supports the body’s own healing process by providing a natural, intact extracellular matrix10. OASIS Extracellular Matrix provides flexibility and versatility for different needs of acute and chronic wounds.

*see product insert leaflet for full instructions for use

SHOW REFERENCES

10. Hodde J, Janis A, Hiles M. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: part II. Bioactivity and matrix interaction. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):545-550.


Ordering Details

Size Pieces per box Product code
3 x 3.5cm 10 C-ECM-1F-3X3.5-2
3 x 7cm 10 C-ECM-1F-3X7-2
7 x 10cm 1 C-ECM-1M-7X10-2
7 x 20cm 1 C-ECM-1M-7X20-2
7 x 20cm 1 C-ECM-2M-7X20-2
  1. Hodde J, Janis A, Ernst D, et al. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: Part I. Composition and matrix architecture. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):537-543.

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